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Fiction by Paolo Bacigalupi

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Posted on Nov 17, 2007 in Blog, Writing | 4 comments

Interesting post on Online Content

Erin Hoffman over at Homeless Moon has an interesting post on how she would try to transcend the print paradigm for magazines. Lots of stuff to chew on. I started commenting over there, and realized I was on the verge of writing another essay.

And in _Car Accident News_, Anjula is feeling much much better. It looks like the meds were causing her complications. She’s now up and running, and even though her back and neck are still stiff and sore, she’s not dizzy and nauseous anymore. So we’ve got a family again. She also says she appreciates all the love people posted here, so thanks for that, too.

I have to say that I’m pretty annoyed that the doctors would prescribe a pain-killer whose side-effects almost perfectly mimic the side-effects of a head trauma for someone who just got out of a car accident.

4 Comments

  1. Thanks for the trackback post, I appreciate it! And I’m so glad your wife is okay! From your description it did sound like medicine reaction, but yeah, it’s disturbing how those side effects can mimic trauma. But I think that kind of painkiller reaction is not uncommon. =/

    I posted a reply to your comments over on Homeless Moon ( http://homelessmoon.com/wordpress/?p=112#comments ) and eagerly await any potential essay response too. :)

  2. Paolo, I forgot to mention, another project you might be interested in is the fiction issue that the Escapist (disclaimer alert, I write nonfiction for them) is running:

    http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/editorials/2585-The-Escapist-Call-for-Writers-2008

    This is the first time they’ve done a fiction issue, and their primary market is gamers. They pay pro rate by mainstream magazine standards — $.25/word.

    Honestly, I think getting published there would mean excellent exposure for SF writers, and I am hugely excited that they’re doing a fiction issue. But I think this is how fiction in mixed-magazines is destined to work. It’s what the Atlantic moved to. I am afraid that the readership for short fiction is just not there — and that, more importantly, markets like the Escapist already have the infrastructure to be running a full online community and magazine, so there is much more potential getting a fiction line started with an existing magazine than there is starting a new one from scratch. The proposition of getting good game writers, up-to-date news, industry connections, and all that jazz would be a tremendous challenge for a new magazine. But starting a fiction line in an existing one might not be. These haven’t fared well historically (SciFiction, etc), but that doesn’t mean that they can’t, and when they do happen, they do tremendous work…

  3. I’m glad to hear Anjula is feeling better.

    As for short story vs novel SF, my wife prefers short stories because it lets her have an hour of fun then get back to work or whatever, whereas a novel takes too long.

    I also tend to prefer short fiction for the same reason, though when I have lots of time I do enjoy a good novel.

  4. Erin, thanks for the escapist link. I’ll check it out.

    Ian, It’s actually surprising to me that short stories aren’t experiencing a resurgence precisely because they give a dose of fiction within a small time frame. With an increasingly fast-paced culture, you’d think that short fiction would find a new niche.

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